eyeforpharma Barcelona 2015 day two summary

eyeforpharma Barcelona 2015 day two summary – Wednesday 25th March 2015

18.20 CET

And that’s me wrapping up for day 2 – see you all tomorrow morning!

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18.19 CET

Shame Zavodnick did not focus on the benefits of social media engagement – as we debate about the industry’s reputation and the need to engage with patients, this is where they are communicating so the industry must find a way, IMO. There is also a lot of medical misinformation (not just product level, but disease level) online, which can only be addressed by those with the right information communicating more openly. Of course, pharma has information on ‘owned’ non-social assets, like their websites, but this is not where patients go – they are on social media, Wikipedia, Google – to ignore this means pharma will not regain any control on the conversation IMO.

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18.15 CET

Access control is also a key consideration in social media, outlines Zavodnick, such as region-specific content and ensuring validation of status as medical doctor before sharing information intended only to medics. But these principles are difficult to adhere to on social media.

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18.10 CET

Zavodnick outlines risk-mitigation strategies around social media for pharma: streamline internal processes and train employees (SOPs, monitoring etc.) and utilise appropriate technology and tools to maximise benefits (response time must be in terms of hours and not days). With regards to adverse event monitoring, pharma companies do not have to monitor 3rd party sites they do not sponsor, but be careful not to establish a precedent of using them so much that you do need to monitor. Data protection is also a key issue, both in terms of protecting against security breaches and ensuring patient consent for collecting any data.

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18.06 CET

Zavodnick: sees value in ‘disease-state platforms’ – social media engagement around disease area, not product, issues. This necessitates some self-regulation principles due to lack of formal guidelines and smart use of technology to make monitoring/compliance efficient. He also sees value in ‘patient programmes’, web platforms to improve disease awareness and adherence. In this instance, pharma must be hands off, providing financial support to a third-party, but not directly interacting with the patients.

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18.03 CET

Dan Zavodnick (Bayer) reminds the audience that DTC is not allowed in Europe and outlines how pharma can play on social media. The ABPI (UK) says pharma can 1) listen, 2) broadcast (don’t allow user comments) or 3) engage, with the associated regulatory burden, which effectively means many companies don’t try to engage (but tech is around that can help here).

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17.57 CET

First slide presents a long list of risks with pharma companies using social media to engage (regulations, user content, data protection, adverse events etc.) and some open questions – can pharma really do two-way communication? Can product information be conveyed on social media? Are companies responsible for user-generated content? My thoughts on the risk-reward balance have been aired here: http://healthworkscollective.com/paul-tunnah/293881/social-media-worth-risk-pharma

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17.54 CET

Finally (last but not least), Bayer present on using social media for patient engagement – a topic I obviously have some opinions on 😉

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17.51 CET

Lode Dewulf chips in to say that the number of patient organisations (100k+) is a problem. His call to patients is to help stop the ‘fragmentation of patient groups’, e.g. 10+ different arthritis groups in one country, if there is to be more productive collaboration between the industry, healthcare professionals and patients. Collaboration, not competition is important in every area, concludes Allan.

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17.45 CET

Allan providing a stark reminder that pharma’s reputation is poor and, sadly, not improving. Better patient engagement is not an option, it is essential and necessary if pharma is to play a productive role in health solutions. However, he is optimistic that there are aligned goals – the willingness to collaborate is there, it is now about finding the right way to implement this change.

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17.38 CET

Allan outlines some key advice to pharma companies on improving reputation from Patient View survey – be honest/transparent, provide useful information, engage on their terms. Sounds very familiar with the messages from the multichannel track!

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17.34 CET

Allan outlines the big trends in the patient movement – the growth of global disease coalitions (academia, HCPs, patients in synergy such as the WHF, ECC, ECPC, IDF), an explosion of companies working with patients (just look at the growth in ‘patient’ job titles), more pressure on compliance / guidelines. The latter point is with the intention of improving reputation / standards of engagement, but has it so far? Still too many headlines about how patient groups / patients distrust big pharma.

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17.26 CET

Absolutely pivotal point from Allan around engagement with patient organisations – don’t just engage with them when you want something but on an ongoing basis (even when you don’t want something) so you build a good relationship. “Engage with them on the rainy days as well as the sunny days”, as he describes it.

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17.24 CET

Allan’s advice on patient engagement is to start by understanding the goal for patient groups and professional organisations, so you can find the middle ground of mutual interest. Some core principles then apply to building these partnerships – equity / fairness, maintaining independence, transparency, mutual benefit, respect and integrity. But from a legal perspective this is where things can get slowed down, in trying to align with these.

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17.21 CET

Allan: the industry needs to reshape itself around this new paradigm of activated, empowered patients. They can provide useful insights, they are key consumers with educational needs and they are changing practice. At the organisational level there are now over 120,000 patient groups (Patient View data) working within every aspect of health systems globally. So how should the pharma industry respond, he asks? Some simple solutions – but can be complex to implement…

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17.18 CET

Now on stage – Keith Allan from Novartis presenting about win-win partnerships with patient organisations and medical associations. He starts by reminding us of “nothing about us without us” – the patient voice must be included in everything. From an industry perspective, individual patients are now at a level where they are shaping policy.

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17.14 CET

Nearing the end of the session – dreams for the future:
Zuniga: A cure for Lupus, but failing that better funding, better education and more people to volunteer within patient groups
Young: Transparency, open access, improved medication, keep pushing boundaries, educate us about the hurdles you have to go through to get a product to market and we will help where we can.
Guillén: My dream is extremely political, as governments have been charged with our health care – they must do everything they can do ensure every element is at its best. However in the credit crunch the reverse is happening across Europe with huge differences between EU member states. We need to do better.
Andrew Schorr interjects – ‘don’t think we are not grateful ~ living here in Europe I know how hard it is to go country to country with different rules, given the chance we will help every step of the way’.

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17.08 CET

Paulo Machado @pjmachado
Patients are #pharma users not customers- Patients are doctors’ customers : MT @MagnusPAFranzen 8% #patients trust #pharma ! #e4pbarca

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17.05 CET

Moving to questions, a GP has flagged that although we are all patients at some stage – there is a common thinking within healthcare that patients cannot or will not understand the full data about their condition – but in his experience the opposite is true – patients want and need this data and where a much higher level understanding is needed it can be broken down and explained differently. Off his own back he has started this approach in the UK region which he operates and received pharma funding to support materials which underpin this approach.
The panel is impressed with this – highlighting again that trust (two way) is critical and dealing with each other on a human level (admitting when facts are not known – but finding out and returning back to patient with them for example) is perhaps core to the ideal experience of care.

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16.57 CET

“Patient organisations, when they start, depend on the industry. The problem is that if we get too dependent on the industry, if they pull out what do we do? We need to reinforce the capacity of the patient organisations as they only have one interest [patient welfare] and this is not going to change, ever”, Guillén outlines his view on how patient organisations need to change.
Young’s view – to share the responsibility – work together to educate and support the patient, while pharma ensures that the HCP is educated/informed about not only therapies but patient needs.
Andrew Schorr, “The stress of being in a relationship with someone who has a chronic disease is high, something else that pharma can be doing is to help us (patients) and our families communicate and understand”.

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16.51 CET

Andrew Schorr on his relationship with his HCP – ‘I know she really cares about me so I never miss a dose’ – [to pharma] this is something you can do, you can create tools to help create this relationship and support both patients and HCPs, something as simple as guiding them with the right questions can help.
Guillén moves to talk about his experience of workshops he has been involved in, believes there is still a gap between patient advocates/groups and doctors – ‘we need to talk more, help them to understand what we do’ he surmised.
What is becoming clear from the panel is a desire for pharma to focus on the individual and in that process ensure they have the ability to plan for their illness, understand their treatment and proactively manage it in an informed way.
Ideal example from Schorr – reference hypertension (but applicable to all conditions) – work with HCPs to ensure patients know what tests, which are on the pathway of your therapy area, are looking for, what the numbers mean, what is good/bad.

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16.44 CET

In the patient track for the next session. Andrew Schorr of PatientPower is leading a panel that includes patient advocates Mike Young (Diabetes), Nuria Zuniga (Lupus) and Juan Fuertes Guillén (Pulmonary Hypertension).
Zuniga outlines that what she wants is for a healthcare system and HCP that truly understand her condition rather than just empathising and treating, fatigue with Lupus has a totally different implication to fatigue in other conditions.
Young wants consistency beyond country boarders – so that he is judged (and measured) the same way – which in turn will help to build bonds between HCPs and patients. He follows that patients should research and inform themselves about their condition wherever possible so that they can judge and ask the right questions of a physician. Ultimately to have the ability (and opportunity) to achieve the outcome the patient wants not the HCP.

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16.30 CET

Villaraviz very honest in his appraisal that pharma is not going to be using the multichannel model that customers want in the near future – but is it worth introducing / carrying on with a model that isn’t what the customers want?

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16.27 CET

Villaraviz presenting his view of which multichannel model to deploy based on product lifecycle stage versus segmentation of customer (low, medium, high potential). It makes sense from an internal perspective, but should (IMO) ideally also factor in the information needs / channel preferences of the customer to be effective. Another common theme emerging around multichannel (and tied to the theme of the event being ‘your customer is in control’) for me is the fact that it must be built around your customers to be effective, not just internal factors.

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16.23 CET

Villaraviz now introduces the concept of the ’empowered rep’, who leverages technology, remote interaction and physical engagement. UCB sees three multichannel models of the future – ‘pure MC’ (digital engagement only), ‘hybrid’ (blends the two) and ’empowered F2F’, which uses digital to deliver better results. Impact increases left to right, as does cost. My view – surely an ’empowered F2F’ model which connects online and offline engagement is the route customers want if it delivers more meaningful interactions – the cost may be higher but surely the return is higher too?

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16.17 CET

Donaldson uses an analogy I recall from last year – the notion of needing a conductor for the multichannel orchestra, is this the sales rep? The UCB model for effective multichannel revolves around ACCA, which stands for awareness, comprehension, commitment, action / learning. All of this sequentially links into information, education and application, with good content and interaction underpinning every stage.

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16.12 CET

Now back in the MCM track listening to Sandy Donaldson and Pablo Ouro Villaraviz (UCB) talking about how MCM is going to impact the future of your customer-facing teams.

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15.36 CET

Battery needs some juice so seems like a good time for a coffee break! Back at 16:00 CET.

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15.32 CET

Butler closes with five key things for good patient support: 1) integration (into practice), 2) personalisation (to the individual), 3) connectivity (to systems, healthcare professionals etc.), 4) emotional resonance and 5) clinical relevance (working with the regulators).

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15.30 CET

Butler: highlighting how it is wrong to dismiss classes of technology, as it’s how you use them that is important, e.g. the Mayo Clinic has had great success in using apps to reduce readmission for heart disease patients. He also sees early diagnosis as a space to watch for pharma. For example, experiments with microbes that can detect the early stages of disease way before they are symptomatic – potentially enormous ramifications for the industry. Tech companies are also investing very heavily in this space.

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15.24 CET

Butler references Mark Zuckerberg in stating that everything we know is being re-engineered around people. Medicine is no different.

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15.21 CET

Butler highlights how, in the rare disease space, technology is enabling patients to be reached in ways that they never could just a few years ago. IMO, ‘mainstream’ diseases can learn a lot from how engagement is managed in the rare disease space and, with personalised medicine, it takes me back to a quote from Pfizer’s CMO, where she referred to the major chronic conditions as being collections of lots of rare diseases, when you understand them at the genetic level.

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15.18 CET

Butler: access to information in healthcare is not just nice-to-have, it is potentially life saving. He references Wikipedia, which we know is a leading destination for patients seeking health information, but it is not easy for patients to engage with, especially where levels of health literacy are low.

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15.14 CET

Butler: every pharma company he speaks to believes they are the one that is really putting the patient at the centre. When it comes to good patient solutions, he believes technology has to become ‘boring’ before it can be useful and he sees four main challenges in Europe for pharma: chronic conditions (the big challenges like heart disease, diabetes etc.), ageing population, health inequalities and access to medicine.

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15.10 CET

Jones: the challenge for the industry is in developing patient solutions that speak to n=2, the individual patient, rather than homogenous solutions that are not specific enough. Definitely parallels here with what we have been hearing in the multichannel track around treating each customer as an individual.

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15.08 CET

Staying in to listen to Richard Jones (Engage) and Alex Butler (The Earthworks) talk about more human-centred patient support programmes.

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15.06 CET

Andrew Schorr gives a shout out to fellow epatient Virgin Simons and his work with Prostate Net!

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15.02 CET

Just nipped over to the patient track to catch the tail end of Andrew Schorr’s presentation – having heard him speak before, would recommend people check out Patient Power’s work in supporting patients. His closing message to pharma – work with us and if our aggregate personal data can help you develop better solutions I’m in favour.

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14.55 CET

Quite a few hands up when asked who are pharma people with silos existing between commercial and medical. No hands up when asked who thinks that is a good thing. Clear message for pharma CEOs there!

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14.54 CET

Sherwell – “a quality CIO makes a big difference”, when it comes to being digitally savvy, but it also depends on where the money sits to make progress (who pays for what). It is really important for IT and commercial to work together and have clear accountability, led from the top. White: we need to be truthful to ourselves about what IT capabilities we need in-house, with ‘the cloud’ much of it can be brought in from external companies, like Amazon etc. – focus on not building internally but managing.

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14.52 CET

Gareth Dabbs @garethdabbs
Majority of audience at #e4pbarca are listening to patients on social media! straw poll by PatientPowerEU @IMSHealth

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14.48 CET

Sherwell recounts about how AstraZeneca’s new(ish) CEO has done a great job of communicating a patient-centric vision both internally and externally – consistently. Everyone now feels more empowered and energised, so it’s a great example of how change can be driven rapidly if it comes from the top. White states that the new bottom line for the industry is either improving quality of life or extending life, which will lead onto profits. But if the industry is not doing this then it will fail both ethically and financially.

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14.42 CET

Allan implores the industry to break down the silos between companies too – especially around the high level issues of awareness, diagnosis and improved outcomes – saying that pharma should not be competing in spaces like patient advocacy. McConnell agrees…..but all accept it is hard to do and probably needs external organisations to help facilitate.

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14.40 CET

Kay Wesley @KayWesley
Compliance can get in the way of XF [cross-functional] working. Agree but it shouldn’t, customers don’t care if you’re medical or marketing #e4pbarca

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14.40 CET

Audience question around how patient associations can help break down pharma silos and work in collaboration. To flip that around, Allan firmly believes the most effective patient groups are those that work in coordination with the pharma industry. He notes that they bring strong patient focus, but pharma has to also focus on the much wider healthcare system – doctors, payers etc. – so clear alignment. White adds that transparency is the key thing in all of this – any (foolish) attempt at being subversive is going to become very transparent in today’s social media age and will simply backfire.

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14.38 CET

LEO Pharma Spain @LEOPharmaEs
“Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning” Listening now to @alanROYGBIV at #e4pbarca thks!

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14.35 CET

White asks the panel how we cope with compliance? Sherwell notes there was much discussion on Twitter yesterday about compliance – is that slightly ironic perhaps? On a serious point, Sherwell highlights how too often compliance are brought into the process too late and hence pushback. It is important to involve compliance early on to ensure a seamless process – “don’t leave compliance until the last minute”.

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14.34 CET

Left to right:
Tim White, Global Director & Head of Customer Interaction, Lundbeck
Niall McConnell, Associate Director Business Excellence, Celgene
Tim Sherwell, Global Multichannel Director, AstraZeneca
Keith Allan, Global Medical Affairs, Novartis

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14.32 CET

Sherwell recounts a recent team collaboration around a launch where it was hard to tell who was ‘medical’ and who was ‘marketing’ due to the close way they worked together. It’s a salient reminder that doctors and patients don’t really care about role titles – they just want the right information and meaningful engagement. Allan brings up the challenges of keeping compliance and legal when trying to integrate teams – the legal side of the business want to keep walls up between some of these functions for fear of breaching regulations.

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14.29 CET

Now back over to the multichannel track where we join a panel of Tim Sherwell (AstraZeneca), Keith Allan (Novartis) and Niall McConnell (Celgene), moderated by Tim White (Lundbeck), on how to create effective cross-functional working.

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14.16 CET

The importance of accreditation would seem to be a confusing point – in France for instance only 50% responded that it needs to be – however 77% of that currently used is. A good point from a GP within the room – in that anything which is linked to training has to be accredited – however valid learning points away from this can include online reading, articles and reports and so the need for accreditation is not there.
What does the future hold?
Within the room – the question of pharma funding for conferences is raised, if this were to stop then less HCPs are likely to attend events and the learning will move online.
The data shows that 51% think more will transfer online – however mirroring the earlier state of play – 84% of the cardiologists in Germany saw events continuing to be the main source for the foreseeable future. In terms of drivers for change – more data and the continued growth of online were seen as contributors to more CME, while loss of funding and greater admin pressures identified as key threats to CME.

What does this all mean for the relationship between CME and pharma? The room feels that we need to look to the US where this process has already accelerated. It also appears that the relationship between pharma and medical societies is becoming strained around events/CME – with Lanre Ibitoye (Lundbeck) indicating that despite approaching two societies recently to get involved with these elements, they have met a block in the road, possibly due to the situation/guidelines not being clear for either party.

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13.55 CET

The M3 EU research shows that an average of 49% of cardiologist learning is performed online – although this is noticeably lower in Germany – thought perhaps to be because of availability. In terms of how this translates into online hours – Spain leads with 85 hours per month, a real contrast to Germany’s 31 hours. (Average 54: UK 34, France 49, Italy 68). Interesting point from the floor reference pharma backed online resources – a desire to have accredited in order to be ‘taken seriously’.
Just 14% of cardiologists across EU5 currently pay for online learning – largest contrast being the UK (27%) and Italy (3%). The in-room physician perspective… Why is there a need to pay when there are so many accredited, high quality online resources? How is education selected? Top two criteria are being unbiased and relevant.

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13.44 CET

Some good stats to kick off – based on research from end of last year, 72% of physicians believe that upcoming pipeline products in the next 3 years will enhance outcomes for patients.
Moving on to education (the focus for this session) – M3 EU’s research looked at the needs of cardiologists in the EU5 countries – challenges in clinical practice and significant event analysis (SEA) most important to physicians in identifying needed learning. Tim Ringrose (M3 EU CEO) questions if this is challenging enough?
In terms of mode of learning – the audience thinks ease of access is a key driver – the survey shows that conferences are still the preferred form of CME in all countries. Len Starnes raises whether there is a difference between CME and keeping up with latest trends – he believes events remain critical for CME – while online can satisfactorily provide the information needed for ‘keeping up’.

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13.33 CET

Next up, we have been invited by M3 EU to join the physician led lunch – looking at education needs across Europe (based on physician research).

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12.16 CET

Now break for workshops and lunch – will see if we can cover one and should also be providing some coverage on a physician discussion over lunch.

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12.14 CET

Cat Metcalfe @CatMetcalfe
Companies starting multichannel implementation grow by 6% in less than a year. Who can afford not to? #e4pbarca

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12.11 CET

The post-presentation questions to Gummati trigger thoughts on how we cannot lose our enthusiasm for MCM – we are making progress in small steps. Len Starnes asks about whether MCM structures need to be more global or local – a big question to end the morning session! Gummati: companies need to have central MCM partners that work alongside the global and local brand teams, but he doesn’t see one ideal structure on the pharma side, so still some thinking to do here.

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12.10 CET

Helen Adams @weenell
A physicians day in 5 years time? Physicians need to get more digital literate and pharma need to help them #e4pbarca

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12.06 CET

Gummati: “we must understand something about our customer from every interaction”, to sequentially drive better engagement over time and build a mutually beneficial relationship. His conclusions are that it is now time for MCM to demonstrate ROI, we must break down information silos to achieve this and cannot simply use MCM to bombard customers – it must be intelligent and useful interaction or will not be effective.

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12.05 CET

Cegedim’s Gummati – the move away from face to face interaction with HCPs has removed the context for a lot of the information we gather. We therefore need to combine data from all interactions to put this context back.

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12.03 CET

Gummati sees the breakdown of information silos as critical to addressing concerns about the ability to implement multichannel marketing. Pharma sees the need for a single customer data repository between sales and marketing as critical. Gummati reiterates the five MCM design principles we saw yesterday: 1) have a common customer ID across channels, 2) have a single view of their profile across channels, 3) extract insights and intelligence on the customer context, 4) segment, plan and align across channels and 5) orchestrate, execute and engage.

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11.58 CET

Gummati: “you are never fully implemented in multichannel” – good news for those working in multichannel marketing, but a serious point too that it has to continually evolve. But some problems remain in this evolution, says a survey by Cegedim. Pharma feels its ability to analyse the marketing mix and target / personalise communications is poor, as is their ability to profile across multiple channels, view all interaction data in one place and use data to plan next steps. So much keeping those multichannel marketers awake at night.

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11.58 CET

Ari @salmaniac
Cegedim claims brand saturation in Multichannel drives bad ROI of channels. I don’t agree. It’s about right mix & high quality. #e4pbarca

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11.53 CET

Gummati: 2014 saw 3.3% budget investment in digital, 37% increase from 2013, but still small numbers versus other sectors. Again – my question, does multichannel = digital? Seems we are using the same term for different things. Everyone is asking about the ROI of digital activities and he feels it is starting to be demonstrated – in US 24% of contacts are digital and increased Rx 32% of the time. Source down as Cegedim Strategic Data but not sure of the methodology. However, compared to countries using digital less (e.g. Italy with 2% of interactions), the effectiveness seems higher, up to almost 50% impact. So are doctors now getting fatigued by digital engagement not done well? Have we taken the sale rep arms race and put it online?

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11.52 CET

Cegedim’s Emiliano Gummati gives insight as to the growth of digital in pharma – e-meetings up by 55%

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11.47 CET

Next up: Emiliano Gummati from Cegedim to talk about the state of multichannel….and where we are heading (other than towards lunch).

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11.46 CET

White’s key takeaways: building a good COE starts with setting a culture aligned to organisational needs, focus on recruiting and developing ‘versatilists’ in the team (people who can adapt to different roles and have diverse skills) and finally, it’s important to show and celebrate success.

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11.43 CET

It is clear from White’s presentation that Lundbeck’s approach to digital transformation has been meticulous – the old adage of fail to prepare and prepare to fail always holds true and I’d say there is very little chance of Lundbeck failing here! He is now looking beyond the commercial side of the organisation too – how can digital transformation start to apply to R&D process too?

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11.40 CET

White talks about how Lundbeck is embracing the ‘business partnership’ approach to transformation through a centre of excellence (COE). Partners must fully understand the local brand situation, help to co-create the solution, strive to make the COE redundant in the future and recognise that it takes time.

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11.35 CET

Now listening to Tim White talk about how Lundbeck is driving digital transformation – including embracing social media.

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10.49 CET

What are the right KPIs for KAM? Too many lagging indicators, like sales, says Schluechter – we need more leading indicators and predictive analysis of whether customer engagement is working. Again, this is an emerging theme for multichannel. Panel summary: we’re not there yet, but we know it’s the right direction, we just need to agree a common definition and finding the right way to measure success is key.
And with that it’s time for a coffee break. Back in the multichannel track around 11.15 CET.

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10.41 CET

Great audience question: How do your customers decide who their key suppliers are? Nice way of switching it around. Panel: if you have a unique product you are a key supplier, but if not then the services you provide around it can make a critical difference. But customers also use tendering processes that can make every supplier look the same – this is a barrier for pharma to the values that KAM aspires to.

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10.37 CET

Almeida reinforces that every country is different and they are all at different stages of evolution around KAM, with different needs. Schluechter agrees – countries like Greece have enormous pressure in the healthcare system and that drives a real willingness to engage with the industry and work more collaboratively through key account management approaches. But is there risk in a KAM strategy, asks Dickerson? Yes – there is risk in everything, says Schluechter! But you have to manage the risk and move. Majetic adds that the essence of KAM is about balancing risk – how many accounts you cover versus time with those accounts – you need regional buy-in as it is too risky for local key account managers to drive the agenda.

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10.30 CET

Dickerson (chairing) suggests that identifying the key accounts should be straightforward given the information available from providers like IMS Health / Cegedim, but there are two challenges here. Firstly, developed markets have heritage relationships that can hinder shift in focus to key accounts and secondly, in developing markets identification of key accounts is harder.

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10.27 CET

Schluechter suggests that the industry is still slow to embrace KAM, because hard times are driving retrenchment to more traditional methods of customer engagement, but perhaps we are at a pivot point where without change the value of current customer engagement is minimal. Again, there are parallels with multichannel as the panel discusses how a global strategy for KAM needs to be refined at the local country level in order to be effective.

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10.25 CET

The KAM panel for the morning session at eyeforpharma Barcelona today – left to right, Dragan Majetic, VP Strategy & Commercial Development at Merz Pharmaceuticals, Abbvie’s Head of Key Account Managers, Rita Almeida and Jan Schluechter, Senior Commercial Executive at Novartis:

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10.24 CET

Kay Wesley @KayWesley tweets:
@julianspinks sees 50 patients a day and works from 7am till 7 pm then continues on SM and eCME at home after 8pm. Who’d be a GP? #e4pbarca

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10.20 CET

Majetic adds that KAM is about marketing and sales working together – but we’re seeing the same thing in the multichannel track. Is it time to retire terms like multichannel marketing and KAM – is this just what all pharma sales and marketing should be, meaningful customer-centric interactions that share useful information, via the right channels, at the right time and adding value over time?

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10.17 CET

Schluechter outlines his vision for KAM – it’s not about sales promotion and a transactional relationship, it’s about common objectives and KPIs with the healthcare providers. Almeida reinforces that good KAM is about ensuring access to customers by building a valued relationship. Majetic adds that there is no standard definition of KAM, but he sees it as a systematic process of selecting and managing accounts that have significant commercial value. Three interesting and subtly different perspectives.

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10.13 CET

Sitting in the KAM track until coffee although the tweets suggest an engaging physician panel taking place in the multichannel room. Here, we have a panel on effective KAM with Jan Schluechter (Senior Commercial Executive, Novartis), Rita Almeida (Head of Key Account Managers, AbbVie) and Dragan Majetic (Vice-President Strategy and Commercial Development, Merz Pharmaceuticals).

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10.06 CET

Navia-Osorio: highlights how it is important to show the doctor you understand the patient journey and have a dialogue with them around which aspects of it they are finding the most difficult to manage, so you can provide genuine support. The example being shown of this working in practice is looking at the smoking cessation market in Spain, where Pfizer got involved in running patient clinics – 160 patients attending, 87 enrolled in the programme and 62% not smoking after two years – apparently a good percentage.

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10.05 CET

Vural Kocak @VuralKocak_BPC
#e4pbarca Pharmacy support is critical in a patients journey to secure medication / Douglas Bock (Patient Stream)

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9.58 CET

Once again, we see the importance of metrics being reinforced – this time around building critical relations with key accounts, as Navia-Osorio presents from his experience with Pfizer. One of the mantras coming from the event has to be implement, measure, refine…..implement, measure, refine. And the metrics in question here are not just about the doctors but also about the end result with the patients, ensuring the approach is mutually beneficial for the customer (doctor, payer), patient and the pharma company.

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9.52 CET

Navia-Osorio: There are some key components to doing KAM well – observe compliance, arouse interest (be interesting to your customers), provide support (don’t just talk about medicines, but other things around it), calculate metrics (know what works) and provide affordable solutions.

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9.46 CET

Busy day today – we’re now jumping into the Key Account Management track to hear Alberto Navia-Osorio (Pfizer) talk about building critical relations for your business in a compliant way.

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9.35 CET

Key lessons for AstraZeneca from Higgins/Sherwell: Securing mandate and support early is key – you will make mistakes and need backing to learn on the go. Secondly, you must localise the strategy. Thirdly, fail fast and adapt (linking back to the first point) – make sure you learn from your mistakes. Finally, hardwire change – for the long term.

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9.32 CET

Another case study from AstraZeneca – this time in Italy. Through linking channels together, email open rates increased from around 4% to 70%, with 40% of email recipients reading the associated leaflet, due to prior activation through other multichannel approaches. Access rates for AstraZeneca to physicians in Italy are now >50% and satisfaction over 75% – driven by both the multichannel approach and the content of the engagement.

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9.29 CET

Interesting to see how AstraZeneca looked very carefully at the composition of multichannel depending primarily on stage of lifecycle, but clearly tweaked based on therapeutic area and geography. For example, in Russia each brand was mapped against where it was versus opportunity, leading to a ‘partial substitution’ strategy for some brands, where rep resource was scaled down and alternative mechanisms deployed. But rather than just implementing the change outright, a test versus control analysis was used (regionally) to determine whether the new approach was working and refined as necessary.

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9.28 CET

Kay Wesley @KayWesley
AZ Russia created brand archetypes – launch, star, fortress etc, and took a different MCM approach for each #e4pbarca

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9.27 CET

AZ talks about commercial change:
Tim Sherwell, Global Digital & Multichannel Director (pictured left) and Adam Higgins, Global Commercial Excellence Director (pictured right), present the AZ six steps to change.

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9.24 CET

Sherwell/Higgins: Six stages were involved in the business transformation: 1) Building a global business case, 2) Securing senior business sponsorship and mandate, 3) Establishing a diverse project team, 4) Using a structured process for assessment and implementation, 5) Building a best practice ‘how to’ guide, and 6) Documenting the learnings religiously. They then worked closely with the local countries to address challenges and implement the model, starting in some therapeutic areas and countries, before scaling across the portfolio.

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9.20 CET

Sherwell/Higgins: Part of the shift in business model was driven by the portfolio shift from primary care to more specialty products, driving a need to move from product-based marketing to creating more loyalty from prescribers. This necessitates an ’emotional’ relationship, which is driven by not just the medicines, but also everything around it and beyond the pill. They see three levels of maturity around multichannel, starting with avoiding frustrating the customer with overmessaging, through more complementary engagement to actually enhancing their experience at the top of the pyramid. Where is your company – are you enhancing customer engagement or multichannel spamming?

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9.16 CET

Is it multichannel marketing or is it just marketing? Great point to kick the day off – in other words, if you’re not doing multichannel you’re not doing marketing. The channels AstraZeneca use include the field force, call centres, service based teams and digital tactics – interesting again to see multichannel including both digital and non-digital channels (and not every company views it this way).

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9.12 CET

We’re back in action at eyeforpharma Barcelona and watching Tim Sherwell and Adam Higgins from AstraZeneca talk about implementing a new multichannel commercial model.

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8.40 CET

Feed will be active from 9am CET

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