Review Microbiome Start-Up Success Stories & Business Models

Microbiome Movement

Since the first list of biotech companies active in the microbiome space was published in 20131, the growth in microbiome-dedicated biotechs has been staggering, with almost several hundred companies either privately-held or publically-listed. Given the rapid growth of these organizations, it’s critical to understand how to effectively establish, grow and sustain microbiome-focused companies to develop novel therapeutics, biomarkers or diagnostics.

At this year’s 4th Microbiome Movement – Drug Development Summit in Boston, we’re delighted to announce our “Start-Up Focus Evening”, an intimate pre-conference discussion to leverage perspectives from cutting-edge researchers and business executives who have either established, pitched or grown a successful microbiome initiative. You can see the full program here: https://ter.li/tjkia6

As part of the conversation, hear from:

  • Cathryn Nagler, Bunning Food Allergy Professor & Co-Founder, UChicago & ClostraBio
    Stimulated by the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, ClostraBio has since raised $4.5 million to develop microbiome-based therapies that prevent or treat allergic reactions to foods and other immune system disease2. As a well revered researcher in the food allergy space, Prof. Nagler will share her thoughts on committing to academia whilst growing a young biotech. 
  • Molly Gibson, Senior Associate, Flagship Pioneering
    With a background in computational biology and computer science, Mollie played a key role in establishing the first computational platform for drug discovery at Kaleido Biosciences, a Flagship microbiome company3. Now as a senior associate, Mollie is working as part of a team of entrepreneurial scientists to conceive, create, resource and develop the first-in-category ventures. 
  • Arpita Maiti, Senior Director, ES&I, I&I and Microbiome, Pfizer
    As part of her role at Pfizer, Arpita seeks to identify late-breaking science that forms the basis of innovative therapies and drives related collaborations alongside scientists and start-ups. Having recently contributed to a publication in Nature Biotechnology4, Arpita is an experienced microbiome researcher and will share new insights into pharmaceutical opinions on microbiome start-ups. 
  • Matt Martin, Microbiome Lead Technology Commercialization, UChicago
    Having helped establish four microbiome-focused biotechs as part of the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation5, Matt works alongside academic researchers and provides access to commercialise their resource including intellectual property development, venture creation, team building and fund raising. 
  • Suguna Rachakonda, Senior Director, Product Development, Cleveland Clinic
    With over 11 years of experience in small molecule drug discovery across various therapeutic areas, Suguna is currently working alongside Dr. Stanley Hazen at the Cleveland Clinic to help commercialise novel research looking at developing a microbiome-based therapeutic to inhibit thrombosis potential6 .

Join the Microbiome Movement as we unlock the therapeutic potential of the microbiome, network with a growing community of cutting-edge researchers from industry and academia, and push your own projects to the next level. Click here to see the full 3 day agenda.

References:
  1. Medicines from Microbiota
    https://www.nature.com/articles/nbt.2548
  2. Universities shift to start up mode
    https://www.chicagobusiness.com/health-care/universities-shift-startup-mode
  3. Digital Biotech Podcast: Molly Gibson of Kaleido Biosciences and Flagship Pioneering
    https://soundcloud.com/digital-biotech/molly-gibson
  4. Translating Microbiome Futures
    https://www.nature.com/articles/nbt.4287
  5. UChicago researchers broaden impact by bringing scientific discoveries to market
    https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/forefront/biological-sciences-articles/2018/december/researchers-broaden-impact-by-bringing-scientific-discoveries-to-market
  6. Development of a gut microbe-targeted non-lethal therapeutic to inhibit thrombosis potential
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6129214/